Personal Injury Attorney Montana

Where Can You Find A Reliable Personal Injury Attorney in Montana?

We have handled many kinds of cases, including car accidents, truck and motorcycle accidents, workers compensation, wrongful death, and many more. There are no cases we cannot handle to help you win or haven’t been involved in.

Automotive Defects

There are many different types of injuries that can happen with personal injury cases in Montana. Breaking your back, injuring your leg, or even serious internal injuries can be endured. There is a wide spectrum of accidents that we have seen and dealt with in court. And we know what is necessary in order to accommodate your recovery. We will investigate the whole situation in as much detail as possible to receive as much compensation as possible on your behalf. If necessary we will take your case to court to receive this compensation.

What Should You Do Right After An Accident?

In the event that any accident happens, you need to seek out medical attention as soon as possible. Once you have done that, you need to see if there are any witnesses to the accident and get as much information as you can from them. You should get the name, and phone # if at all possible.

When you consult with your personal injury attorney, you will need as much information as possible. This may even include details such as where the accident happened, what you were doing when the accident happened, etc. Information from witnesses are important in the case your incident gets escalated to court. Additionally, if you were to hire any investigators into the process, they would talk to the witnesses themselves.

 

How Important is it to Call a PI Attorney in Montana After an Accident?

Trucking Accident

Let the "games" begin.

On Friday, you left the office pretty confident that on Monday the normal routine would ebb and flow. Nothing "out of the ordinary" was expected. In fact, you'd relegated yourself to the fact that your career as a paralegal/legal assistant/legal secretary was quite boring but, hey, it paid ok, you had health benefits and even enjoyed work free weekends - most of the time.

But what was going on behind the scenes was another story.

You see, over the past year some decisions were made - poor decisions - that affected the law firm you worked for. Decisions to hire an attorney or two with a supposed "following" did not pan out. Do you follow me? Think of your hairdresser. When a hairdresser graduates from beauty school, she (or he) does not have a "following" or a "book of business". It takes at least a few years to build up a clientele. Some clientele stay with you, some don't. And so the game goes.

The same thing is true concerning attorneys. Over the years, attorneys hopefully build a "following". When a partnership goes sour, the attorney quite literally takes his "book of business" with him wherever he goes (if he hasn't signed some cockamamie agreement with his current law firm that restricts this). Sounds fair, doesn't it? If the attorney has truly garnered these clients on his own, wined and dined them, nurtured the relationship, worked hard to earn their trust, etc., he should be allowed to transport the clients along to the next partnership.

But guess what? Your attorneys, in their quest for increasing their income by bringing on a new seasoned associate or two (accompanied by their VAST "book of business) forgot to perform their due diligence. That is, they "assumed" the new, seasoned associates (30-40 year law veterans) actually had a viable "book of business". Wrong.

Network, Network, Network

1. Join your local legal assistant, legal secretary or paralegal organization. Attend the meetings regularly. Volunteer for committees. The friends you make could be real lifesavers when you find yourself without a job unexpectedly.

2. Is there a legal administrators website in your city which lists available jobs? If so, watch the website regularly, especially when new jobs are added.

3. Become familiar with the owner(s) of the placement agencies in town. We have one in the city I live in which is owned by an attorney, catering to the legal community solely.

Prepare yourself for the unexpected. God has blessed you beyond measure. Be wise. The legal job market is very competitive. How will you compete? What do you have to place on the negotiating table? Understand your strengths and weaknesses and seek to improve yourself constantly.

Think on these things. Simply begin to strengthen those areas you are weak in and you will succeed. The Lord will bless your efforts.

What Kind of Lawyer Do You Need?

Nursing Home Abuse

Let the "games" begin.

On Friday, you left the office pretty confident that on Monday the normal routine would ebb and flow. Nothing "out of the ordinary" was expected. In fact, you'd relegated yourself to the fact that your career as a paralegal/legal assistant/legal secretary was quite boring but, hey, it paid ok, you had health benefits and even enjoyed work free weekends - most of the time.

But what was going on behind the scenes was another story.

You see, over the past year some decisions were made - poor decisions - that affected the law firm you worked for. Decisions to hire an attorney or two with a supposed "following" did not pan out. Do you follow me? Think of your hairdresser. When a hairdresser graduates from beauty school, she (or he) does not have a "following" or a "book of business". It takes at least a few years to build up a clientele. Some clientele stay with you, some don't. And so the game goes.

The same thing is true concerning attorneys. Over the years, attorneys hopefully build a "following". When a partnership goes sour, the attorney quite literally takes his "book of business" with him wherever he goes (if he hasn't signed some cockamamie agreement with his current law firm that restricts this). Sounds fair, doesn't it? If the attorney has truly garnered these clients on his own, wined and dined them, nurtured the relationship, worked hard to earn their trust, etc., he should be allowed to transport the clients along to the next partnership.

But guess what? Your attorneys, in their quest for increasing their income by bringing on a new seasoned associate or two (accompanied by their VAST "book of business) forgot to perform their due diligence. That is, they "assumed" the new, seasoned associates (30-40 year law veterans) actually had a viable "book of business". Wrong.

Network, Network, Network

1. Join your local legal assistant, legal secretary or paralegal organization. Attend the meetings regularly. Volunteer for committees. The friends you make could be real lifesavers when you find yourself without a job unexpectedly.

2. Is there a legal administrators website in your city which lists available jobs? If so, watch the website regularly, especially when new jobs are added.

3. Become familiar with the owner(s) of the placement agencies in town. We have one in the city I live in which is owned by an attorney, catering to the legal community solely.

Prepare yourself for the unexpected. God has blessed you beyond measure. Be wise. The legal job market is very competitive. How will you compete? What do you have to place on the negotiating table? Understand your strengths and weaknesses and seek to improve yourself constantly.

Think on these things. Simply begin to strengthen those areas you are weak in and you will succeed. The Lord will bless your efforts.